Our artwork

Our market vision is to celebrate local production and innovation, blurring the lines between production and consumption and bringing our origins to centre stage.  We have a beautiful, and very important natural resource next to us, the Wonnerup wetlands, acknowledged by the Wadandi Pibulman people as being a food-bowl for the south west.  We help tell this story through the art that is integrated into the building’s signage, artwork, storytelling and way finding.

Ian Mutch

Local artist Ian Mutch collaborated with local artists Sandra Hill and Alan Meyburgh to curate the combined Origins Market art works.

“Through art installations we’re trying to create a connection to land, particularly highlighting the significance the wetlands had to traditional owners. They were like the original supermarket, a meeting place, and a source of food.

“When we shop for food these days we’re used to a straight-to-consumer kind of culture with a gap between farmers and buyers. We’re trying to close that gap with Origins Market, allowing people to talk directly to the vendors and experience food in a much more conscious way,” Ian said.

Applying a variety of techniques and mediums, Ian creates a whimsical world through paintings, illustrations designs and installations.  Here at Origins Market, Ian’s work brings life to the children’s playground and envelops the buzz of the observational beehive.

Sandra Hill

Wadandi artist Sandra Hill is well known for her profound paintings, prints and sculptures, which reflect her Aboriginality, spirituality and personal identity. Building on the stories shared by Wadandi elder Wayne Webb, Sandra created drawings which depict the Wadandi six seasons.

Sandra’s Six Season’s works have been shaped into beautiful hanging tapestries which line the walkways of the market. Sandra’s work demonstrates the importance of the seasons in connection to growing food and through her work allows people visiting Origins Market a deeper understanding of place.

In the south west of Western Australia, each of the six seasons represents and explains the seasonal changes we see annually. The seasons can be long or short and are indicated by what is happening and changing around us rather than by dates on a calendar.

Alan Meyburgh

The use of upcycled timbers and materials is a prominent feature of local artist, Alan Meyburgh’s work throughout the markets. His entry sculpture displayed on the market’s façade is a series of seven flying Ibis returning home to wetland paperbark trees. They use the wetlands to roost, nest and feed.

Alan’s creations include sculptural bike racks with seats which look like wetlands reeds, plus a dog bowl feature piece that portrays swan eggs. Each is made from recycled materials – old jarrah fence posts, steel offcuts and steel reinforcing rods left over from construction projects.

“Wayne told us that as a boy when he was at the wetlands, they’d look for swan eggs for food. One thing that stood out to me from this story was it’s important not to take all the eggs. You just take enough so that it’s sustainable, that is how the land keeps replenishing itself and we can all continue to grow.”

As you enter the markets Alan has created a portal built from the very pallets used to deliver the materials for the Origins Market building. His concept draws on his own experience as a child walking through a garden tunnel to the beach, the feeling of nature all around you leading you down a path and opening to an experience of discovery.